How do I?

Cite Resources
Catalog Tips
Journal Database Tips
Passwords for Home Access

Cite Resources

Citation Guides

APA, MLA, and Chicago Guides:

University of California, Berkeley

Using MLA format:

OWL at Purdue, MLA

Using APA format:

OWL at Purdue, APA

Using Chicago format:

Chicago Manual of Style Quick Guide

Citation Generators:

These sites will generate your citation for you in the documentation style of your choosing. Students are responsible for verifying and correcting potential formating issues.

http://www.stylewizard.com
http://www.noodletools.com
http://www.easybib.com
http://citationmachine.net

Close Citation Guide by Subject

Catalog Search Tips

Boolean Keyword Searching

and “and” means you want results with BOTH terms present Example: apples and oranges brings up only results with both apples and oranges in the result.
or “or” means you want results with EITHER one term OR the other. Example: apples or oranges brings up results with either apples or oranges.
not “not” means you want results with one word, but not containing another Example: “Gulf of Mexico” not oil, will bring up results regarding the “Gulf of Mexico”, but exclude all results that include the word “oil”

Removing “the”, “a”, or “an” from the beginning of title searches

Words like “the”, “a”, or “an” are considered nonsense words that, if included in the cataloging of a title, would place that title in a different alphabetical location. For this reason, they are not included and should be excluded from search functions.

Use Subject Searches

Subject Searches are Library of Congress Subject designations. Use of these pre-designated search terms can increase speed and accuracy of searching.

Subject term links are found in the computer record for the item, or may be browsed through the subject search function in the catalog

Journal Searching

Boolean Searching

Boolean searching is using specific words such as “and”, “or”, and “not” to tell the database how your search terms relate to one another. Boolean words can be different in different databases.

EbscoHost

and “and” means you want results with BOTH terms present Example: apples and oranges brings up only results with both apples and oranges in the result.
or “or” means you want results with EITHER one term OR the other. Example: apples or oranges brings up results with either apples or oranges.
not “not” means you want results with one word, but not containing another Example: “Gulf of Mexico” not oil, will bring up results regarding the “Gulf of Mexico”, but exclude all results that include the word “oil”

Gale

and “and” means you want results with BOTH terms present Example: apples and oranges brings up only results with both apples and oranges in the result.
or “or” means you want results with EITHER one term OR the other. Example: apples or oranges brings up results with either apples or oranges.
not “not” means you want results with one word, but not containing another Example: “Gulf of Mexico” not oil, will bring up results regarding the “Gulf of Mexico”, but exclude all results that include the word “oil”

Proquest

and “and” means you want results with BOTH terms present Example: apples and oranges brings up only results with both apples and oranges in the result.
or “or” means you want results with EITHER one term OR the other. Example: apples or oranges brings up results with either apples or oranges.
and not “and not” means you want results with one word, but not containing another Example: “Gulf of Mexico” and not oil, will bring up results regarding the “Gulf of Mexico”, but exclude all results that include the word “oil”

Close Boolean Searching

Orders of Operation

The order of operation is the order in which a specific database searches selected boolean functions.

Ebsco, Order of Operation

Auto set is “and” then “not” then “or” Example: trap and mouse or rat not chemical = ((mouse and trap)  or (rat not chemical)

Gale, Order of Operation

Auto set is “not” then “and” then “or” Example: Example: trap and mouse or rat not chemical =((rat not chemical) or (trap and mouse))

Proquest, Order of Operation

Auto set is “and” then “or” then “not” Example: trap and mouse or rat not  chemical=((trap and mouse)or rat) not chemical

Close Orders of Operation

Truncation

Truncation symbols are used to more easily focus and broaden searching.

EbscoHost Truncation

Multiple characters at the end *

Example: comput* will bring up computer, computers, computing

One character ?

Example:  fe?t will bring up feet and feat

One or no characters #

Example: colo#r will bring up color and colour

Gale Truncation

Multiple characters at the end *   Example: appl* will bring up apple and apples
One character ? Example: fe?t will bring up feet and feat
One or no characters ! Example: colo!r will bring up color and colour

Proquest Truncation

Multiple characters at the end * Example: appl* will bring up apple and apples
One character replacement ? Example: fe?t will bring up feet and feat

Close Truncation

Proximity Searching

Proximity search functions are used to specify distance between and order of search terms.

Ebsco Proximity Search

N words appear within a certain number of words (regardless of order) Example: apple N5 pear = will result in all articles in which apple and pear are 5 words or less apart, regardless of order of appearance
W words apper within a certain number of words (in the order in which they were searched) Example: apple W5 pear = will result in all articles in which apple appears before pear and the two words are within 5 words.

Gale Proximity Search

N words appear within a certain number of words (regardless of order) Example: apple N5 pear = will result in all articles in which apple and pear are 5 words or less apart, regardless of order of appearance
W words apper within a certain number of words (in the order in which they were searched) Example: apple W5 pear = will result in all articles in which apple appears before pear and the two words are within 5 words.

Proquest Proximity Search

W/# Finds articles with words appearing within a number of words (regardless of order)
W/PARA Finds articles with words appearing within a paragraph
W/DOC Finds articles with words appearing within the document (excludes abstract and fields)
NOT W/# Finds articles with words that do not appear with certain number of words.
PRE/# Finds articles with words that appear within a number of words in the order the words were searched.

Close Proximity Searching

Close Search Tips

Database Authorization Passwords

Students:

Passwords to all databases are located on your Blackboard Site.

  • Go to Blackboard Log In and log in
  • Go into your “Student How To’s” Class
  • Click on “Library Tutorials”
  • Access the document called “Lee Library Research Databases Authorizations.”

Staff and Faculty:

  • Go to Blackboard Log In and log in.
  • Go into your “Crowder Staff Development” course
  • Click the “Basic Information” tab
  • Click “Library”
  • Access the document called “Lee Library Research Database Authorizations.”

Click to Close